Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Noun

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is organized, present-oriented psychotherapeutic modification designed for people with a variety of behavioral health and mental health issues, such as depression and substance abuse disorders. CBT emphasizes transforming a person’s thoughts and cognitions from negative and poor functioning to positive.  The basic premise is that an underlying cognition about a behavior results in a positive or negative thought and belief.  For example, if one believes indulgence in sweets is for weak people, then that person may feel guilty and low if sweets are eaten.  The same behavior could for someone else mean a treat for good work, so that person takes pride in the action.  A clinician works to change the negative thought processes into positive ones by replacing faulty thought patterns. In order to create a substitute strategy to counteract the undesirable behavioral patterns, a professional therapist first assesses the troubled person to identify the specific thoughts to be addressed.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the treatment methods that have been confirmed to be highly effective in helping depressed young adults and teens. This is supported by the high success rates recorded whenever CBT is used to treat any of the psychological disorders that distressed youths may suffer from. The troubled teen disorders treated with CBT include eating disorders, mood, personality and anxiety disorders. It is also highly effective in treating people suffering from self-harm, as well as alcohol and drug addiction.

CBT helps to treat distressed youth by pointing out superficial problems, as well as identifying the unseen issues that are responsible for a youth’s negative behaviors. CBT helps the person solve his or her problems successfully because it makes it possible to eliminate symptomology once the person can separate him or herself from the exact affliction, thereby, further progressing into a recovery state.